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In the Garb of Nanda Devi Raj Jaat : a Cultural Treatise of Western Himalaya /

de Singh Negi, Chandra. (aut.)
Collation: 1 vol. (VI-152 p.-[24] p. de pl.) : ill. ; 25 cm.Édition: Deradun (Uttarakhand) : Winsar Publishing Co., 2013.ISBN: 9788186844229.Contenu: Résumé : Nanda Devi Raj Jaat qualifies as one of the most arduous pilgrimages in the history of religion. Towards a better understanding of the Jaat, the author has taken the liberty of including salient features of the culture of the Central Himalaya, the facets of which will duly be appreciated by a keen observer during the conduct of the Jaat itself. The book is divided into 10 chapters. Chapter 1 delves into the experiences of the author himself, a personal growth towards appreciating the traditional norms, and relating those facets of the lifestyle with the conservation of the vital resources. Chapter 2 attempts to render the myth/s that surrounds the principle deities- one the Nanda Devi herself, the other her consort, Lord Shiva. Chapter 3 to 8 covers the route, the travelogue. Since the Jaat, primarily relates the life of the women inhabitants of the hills vis a vis the goddess Nanda, chapter 9 remains an endeavour to relate a few of the stories experienced by the author during his sojourn, detailing the kind of hardships experienced by these brave souls. The most touching part of the whole Jaat remain the folksongs sung by the womenfolk. Chapter 9 additionally also encompasses some of these folksongs. The dread, the fear, the taboo, and the abhorrence that male folks carry during the Jaat towards the fairer sex being part of the Jaat, which ultimately gets expressed several times, as one nears the final destination of Hom Kund; one taboo that is kept alive relate to the cause of the Roopkund mishap, attributed to menstrual blood. Chapter 10 attempts to delve into this ‘menstrual taboo’. To end with, the present effort is not a travelogue, but more- a vivid picture of the life led by the inhabitants, more so of the ladies, the Nandas. Sujet RAMEAU: Pèlerinages hindous Inde Nanda Devi (Inde ; mont) Sujet géographique RAMEAU: Himalaya Moeurs et coutumes | Himalaya Vie religieuseType de document: OuvrageLangue du document: anglaisPays d'édition: Inde
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CEH
SING / CEH-29550 (Browse shelf) Available

Bibliographie. Glossaire. Appendix. Index.

Résumé : Nanda Devi Raj Jaat qualifies as one of the most arduous pilgrimages in the history of religion. Towards a better understanding of the Jaat, the author has taken the liberty of including salient features of the culture of the Central Himalaya, the facets of which will duly be appreciated by a keen observer during the conduct of the Jaat itself. The book is divided into 10 chapters. Chapter 1 delves into the experiences of the author himself, a personal growth towards appreciating the traditional norms, and relating those facets of the lifestyle with the conservation of the vital resources. Chapter 2 attempts to render the myth/s that surrounds the principle deities- one the Nanda Devi herself, the other her consort, Lord Shiva. Chapter 3 to 8 covers the route, the travelogue. Since the Jaat, primarily relates the life of the women inhabitants of the hills vis a vis the goddess Nanda, chapter 9 remains an endeavour to relate a few of the stories experienced by the author during his sojourn, detailing the kind of hardships experienced by these brave souls. The most touching part of the whole Jaat remain the folksongs sung by the womenfolk. Chapter 9 additionally also encompasses some of these folksongs. The dread, the fear, the taboo, and the abhorrence that male folks carry during the Jaat towards the fairer sex being part of the Jaat, which ultimately gets expressed several times, as one nears the final destination of Hom Kund; one taboo that is kept alive relate to the cause of the Roopkund mishap, attributed to menstrual blood. Chapter 10 attempts to delve into this ‘menstrual taboo’. To end with, the present effort is not a travelogue, but more- a vivid picture of the life led by the inhabitants, more so of the ladies, the Nandas.

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