Bibliothèque du Centre A.G. Haudricourt
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Dalits in Népal

de Guneratne, Arjun (éd.)
Collation: 1 vol. (102 p.) ill., couv. ill. en coul.Périodique: : Himalaya: the journal of the association for Nepal and Himalayan studies : 2007, vol. 27, n° 1 & 2, (issn 0891-4834) -- [Autres dépouillements]ISSN: 0891-4834.Contenu: The present volume speaks to the general theme of the Dalit experience in Nepal, a topic that Himalaya has paid little attention to in the past. Laurie Vasily did most of the work of recruiting submissions, and I am most grateful to her. Three of the four papers, by Cameron, Folmar and Kharel, deal with the formation of political identity among Nepali Dalits as they seek to become full and equal members of Nepal’s polity. Cameron focuses on the complexities of the relationship (including that of the moral economy) between rural Dalit households and other caste groups in Nepal’s villages, to develop a critique of proposals for social and legal reform that emanate from policy makers and activists located in urban centers who are informed by notions of political identity that have limited relevance for the social experience of rural Dalits. Based on fieldwork conducted in central and western Nepal, Folmar discusses the strategies that Dalits use to manipulate their identities, and, in his words, “challenge, subvert, bend or skirt the caste system to individual and group ends” (p. 44) as they seek greater political freedom and access to the public sphere. The paper by Kharel discusses the divergent strategies used by Dalit activists based in political parties and in NGOs in their struggle to assert full rights of citizenship in Nepal for Dalits, and the ways in which they invoke the discourse of state sovereignty on the one hand and international human rights law on the other. Bishwakarma, Hunt and Zajicek argue for a more complex understanding of social reality in policymaking that takes account of the multiple dimensions of social experience, including, where Dalit women are concerned, the lived experience of caste, class and gender. We round off the issue with a report by Debarati Sen on research she recently concluded in Darjeeling in which she examines the question of why women who independently grow tea on their own land tend to be more politically active than women plantation workers. Thématique spécifique: Identité politique | Opinion politique | Population rurale | Droits de l'homme | Ethnicité | Femme | Relations socialesGéographique: Darjeeling | Himalaya | Népal Ethnique: Dalit Type de document: Numéro Spécial de PériodiquePays d'édition: Etats-Unis d'Amériques Ressource en-ligne: Accès public
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Bibliogr.

The present volume speaks to the general theme of the Dalit experience in Nepal, a topic that Himalaya has paid
little attention to in the past. Laurie Vasily did most of the work of recruiting submissions, and I am most grateful to
her. Three of the four papers, by Cameron, Folmar and Kharel, deal with the formation of political identity among
Nepali Dalits as they seek to become full and equal members of Nepal’s polity. Cameron focuses on the complexities
of the relationship (including that of the moral economy) between rural Dalit households and other caste groups in
Nepal’s villages, to develop a critique of proposals for social and legal reform that emanate from policy makers and
activists located in urban centers who are informed by notions of political identity that have limited relevance for
the social experience of rural Dalits. Based on fieldwork conducted in central and western Nepal, Folmar discusses
the strategies that Dalits use to manipulate their identities, and, in his words, “challenge, subvert, bend or skirt the
caste system to individual and group ends” (p. 44) as they seek greater political freedom and access to the public
sphere. The paper by Kharel discusses the divergent strategies used by Dalit activists based in political parties and
in NGOs in their struggle to assert full rights of citizenship in Nepal for Dalits, and the ways in which they invoke
the discourse of state sovereignty on the one hand and international human rights law on the other. Bishwakarma,
Hunt and Zajicek argue for a more complex understanding of social reality in policymaking that takes account of
the multiple dimensions of social experience, including, where Dalit women are concerned, the lived experience of
caste, class and gender. We round off the issue with a report by Debarati Sen on research she recently concluded
in Darjeeling in which she examines the question of why women who independently grow tea on their own land
tend to be more politically active than women plantation workers.

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